Archive | Major RSS feed for this section

Boosting That Transcript and Gaining Knowledge

4 May

Now, lots of people might ask “why take classes you don’t need? Why torture yourself with some “classes” in the summer that don’t “count” for something? Well, there’s three reasons:

1. I’ll admit to being a nerd and enjoying learning. Crazy, I know

2. To go along with that, these classes will boost my knowledge of the field I want to work in, and related items.

3. It’ll boost my transcript and show I’m really serious about this, and not doing the bare minimum.

How will I go about doing this? Taking Continuing Education Credits (CEUs) that SLP’s have to take for their license, but without getting credits at the end. Since I’m not a licensed professional, I don’t need the credits themselves, so I’m just taking the classes. It’s fairly simple. You can search on ASHA for CEUs you’d like, online or in person,  and find their provider, then take the class through the provider.

One of the main online providers (which makes it easier) is speechpathology.com, and what’s good is they give a discount to STUDENTS! It’s only $49/ year for access to all of their courses, which can be text, audio or video! And then you can take the test at the end. Each class is worth a different amount of CEUs and is a different difficulty level and length, but most I’ve found are 1 hour long, so not much time at all! There’s even some classes related to audiology.

Another provider I’ve seen on ASHA (although it’s not for credits, I’d still prefer it to be accredited) is linguisystems.com. I’ve actually seen some SLPs mention this on Facebook… and they love it cause some of the CEUs are free! So even better. 🙂 That should be an easy way to gain more insight without having to hurt the college budget.

 

Those are just two examples to help boost that resume and just keep learning. Some even say it helped for finding a Clinical Fellowship Year (CFY) after graduate school. :)Check ASHA for other providers, or even take ones that might not be approved! If they don’t count for credits then it may not matter anyway. 🙂 Just make sure you jot down the courses and speakers to write on your resume!

 

 

Advertisements

What’s Up Wednesday: Infographic on SLP

20 Feb

Whether you are still undecided, decided but have no idea about the process, want to check where you are along the path or just want to look at in infographic on becoming and staying a SLP, then I’ve got a treat for you. Some lovely people have patched this together to give a quick and comprehensive overview of what it take to one day be a SLP. It helps lay the foundation, almost like a pictoral checklist, from which you can look back on when needed to make sure you are on track. On top of this, it also lists the average wages, areas where SLPs are paid the most, and the work schedule/settings as well! (According to this, SLP is in the top 15 careers!)

*found at:http://www.infographicsonly.com/how-to-become-a-speech-pathologist/

Research, Research, Research

10 Feb

If you know me, you know I love learning and expanding my knowledge, especially if it’s something I’m interested in. And well, I’m one happy chica right now, as I get to research two separate topics dealing with two different things I love (with some over-lapping!). My first project is a paper on Childhood Apraxia for my Intro to SLP class. I love learning about different diseases, how they relate to speech disorders and development and just anything to do with children or my future profession! (Although, I’m not dead-set on child therapy yet, but considering I’ve had more experience with kids makes it more viable.) It was a hard decision choosing a topic for this because, similar to the child-adult debate, there’s some uncertainty about what I want to specialize in, if I do. There’s just sooo many possibilities that I didn’t know about! Childhood Apraxia of Speech ended up beating out the other contenders, though! It is just captivating, especially since it’s not really acquired, which means that the child was born with it. And it has such a range of severity, with the most severe being almost unable to say any formidable and understandable words. How could that not spark interest?! I’ll be looking into many things, including possible therapies and such, so I’ll be up-to-date on that by the end of this!

 

The second project I am taking part in is actually a group project for my Genes and Diseases class (gahhh, genetics! I love it.) Turns out we are all CSD majors, and our topic was narrowed down to Deafness. For this we’ll have to figure out how it goes from a mutation in the DNA that mis-translates into a bad protein that then causes deafness. Apparently there are many genes related to deafness! We had to pick one that seemed most prevalent so we were certain we’d find enough info.  We also get to actually see where it is located and everything! Which makes me all the more excited since it’ll help me curb my appetite for genetics. I may also be able to use this information in my career as an SLP, especially since I hope to learn ASL. 🙂

 

I’ll be sure to keep you guys updated on anything I find interesting and whatnot! What are some diseases, conditions or anything related to Speech-Language Pathology or genetics that interest you?

Philanthropies/Organizations to be involved with

1 Feb

As  student and eventually professional, you’ll want to be associated with some organizations or charities. These will most likely have some relation to your field; such as, if you’re a doctor you might join Doctors Without Borders, or if you’re studying Political Science you are probably involved with Student Government. There’s many possibilities for you to get involved with, whether you want to volunteer some of your time or simply become more educated about your field/community. Here’s  a list of possible ones you might want to be involved with as a future/ current SLP. 🙂  I’ve listed them under “Semi-Mandatory” for ones you will need to join, or most likely should join, and then “Optional” for those you don’t need but can do based on your interests and intentions.

SEMI-MANDATORY:

-ASHA ( American Speech-Language-Hearing Assoc.) – for SLPs, Audiologists and Speech/Hearing Scientists

-NSSLHA (National Student Speech-Language and Hearing Assoc.)- for undergrad/grad students studying CSD/SLP.

** there is a national chapter, and probably a local one at your school

OPTIONAL:

-Linguistics, Psychology or language club. These are all related to SLP

-Volunteer Clubs (ie. Project Sunshine, Circle K, etc)

-Special Olympics

-Tutoring/mentoring program, like AmericaReads or JumpStart

-Non-profits for Apraxia, Autism, Cerebral Palsy, Veteran Services, Operation Smile other diseases related to SLP

-Participate in walks for Apraxia, Autism…

-Multicultural club/organization

-state NSSLHA/ ASHA

-charities for speech, behavioral, mental disorders

This isn’t an extensive list, just some ideas that came to mind… if you can think of any more, let me know! 🙂 I’ll certainly add them and give credit!

SLP Skills Saturday #1

26 Jan

I’ve decided to add another themed day to go along with my “What’s Up Wednesdays”. The new themed day, “SLP Skills Saturday” will be a bi-weekly feature that will highlight a different personality trait or characteristic that I think SLPs need. Hope you enjoy, and don’t forget to follow me or like/comment/share my posts! I love it, and it’ll help me make this blog better. 🙂

DESIRE TO LEARN

A big aspect of this job is learning, whether it be in your undergraduate, graduate or professional years. This job necessitates a broad scope of subjects to be a licensed SLP, which means that you have to be as well-rounded as possible.

In your undergraduate years you have to study a variety of areas– biological sciences, physical sciences, statistics, communication sciences/disorders, language development, psychology… just to name a few. So, if you thought you could become a SLP without having to take a biology-related or chemistry/physics… think again. You’ll especially need physics for later classes in hearing and speech sciences where you calculate the frequencies of sounds and such.

As for your graduate studies, you’ll do some of these classes more in-depth. So be prepared to build a solid foundation in your undergraduate years to build upon. Of course you’ll also be studying specific disorders related to speech and hearing, and applying them in your clinical sessions. That leads to another thing: be prepared to do clinicals. Think you can be licensed without getting supervised training? Then you might want to look for a different profession. You need many hours (think hundreds, not just tens of hours) of supervised clinical experience in which you will be critiqued on your lesson plans, evaluations and treatments. If that’s not how you want to learn and get accredited, this might not be for you.

Lastly, all SLPs are required to continue learning even after they have graduated and gotten their CCC’s. You’re required to take a certain amount of Continuing Education Units (CEUs) EVERY year. This is to keep you up-to-date on new things happening in the field and to keep you well-rounded (of course, you can probably take some credits in your specialty too. SO maybe not completely well-rounded.) If you don’t want a job that requires you to keep learning each year to stay licensed, then you might want to look elsewhere.

Hope you found this helpful and it wasn’t so negative! Haha. I didn’t mean for it to seem like “don’t do this if…”, that’s just the way this one turned out! Look out for the next “SLP Skills Saturday” in two weeks! (Maybe next week… I’m liking this idea!)

Neuroanatomy: Scary, Yet Intruiging

21 Jan

As per the ASHA requirements, and many American graduate program pre-requisites, those wanting to become a certified SLP must take classes in the biological sciences. They must pertain to human or animal biology as well. It makes sense, after all, how do you expect to understanding speech and hearing mechanisms without understanding the underlying mechanisms that are fundamental to their function? Most undergraduate programs consider classes in biology, anatomy, neuroscience and genetics for this requirement. If your someone like me who dreaded biology in high school (for some reason I enjoyed chemistry more..  I’m a weirdo, I know), this can be a daunting decision, especially since my university dictates I must take 6 semester hours… aka TWO classes in this area for a degree in CSD.

I knew that I didn’t want to take biology. There’s no way I’d touch that with a ten foot pole. But then what should I take? I want to learn and challenge myself, but I don’t want to kill myself either. I knew I’d be required to take anatomy and physiology of speech AND hearing processes as later classes (also required in my program). Plus, I hear that regular A& P at my school is very strenuous… ayy! So this left me with Neuroscience classes, or Genetics. Now, the one part of high school biology I DID enjoy was genetics. I have a feeling that if there was a way I could’ve double- majored in CSD and Genetics without having to take like 5 biology classes/ major in “molecular BIOLOGY”… then I would’ve done that. Sadly, the genetics class (Genes and Diseases) that I did want, was completely full last semester. (No worries, I got in this semester! 😉 ) This left me with choosing a Neuroscience class as my first biological sciences fulfillment.

Some of them seemed very daunting, including some that I had no idea what they meant. Then my eye caught something that sounded hopeful: Brain and Behavior. Well, I enjoy behavioral sciences. I find psychology and sociology interesting. And psychology also includes the brain, which I’d like to no more about at the physiological and neuronal level. So, I took a leap of faith a decided to take it.

The first class proved to be nerve-racking; I found out that our grade was based on 3 test scores. THREE TEST SCORES. First, this is a neuroanatomy/neuroscience class… now I have to manage to compress all this information into my brain and remember it for three tests? Ahh, not good. I’m more of a homework, quizzes and midterm/final kind of person. The more grades, the merrier! Somehow, I managed to get the hang of this neuroanatomy stuff. First I had to learn the inner workings of the brain, what part does this, what little things link to other little things to make a bigger thing happen, what happens if one fails… basically all the things I hated about biology, but in the brain. Then, we got into the more interesting subjects and seeing that basis of information being applied on a broader scale. Now, I was truly invested.

 

We began to relate this knowledge to diseases. In fact, quite a few dealt with disorders in the realm of SLP. Two of them were the ever-popular Wernicke’s and Broca’s Aphasias. The neuronal information that we had learned in the beginning actually helped me learn about these speech disorders as I could apply all the circuitry and figure out that if something was wrong in this section of the brain, then the outcome would result in a certain Aphasia, and other behavioral deficits. By not only knowing how it affected the patient’s Aphasia, but the other disabilities it could cause can help a lot in the field of Communication Science and Disorders. After all, in my post about Temple Grandin’s speech, if we can’t understand the other things involved besides the speech problem, how can we properly address and treat our patients?

 

After all was said and done, I received a decent grade in the class. I also realized that although the title “Neuroscience” as a course classifier maybe seem overwhelming and intimidating, it can prove to be less of a task and more of a learning process. And a fun one at that! Plus, as I seem to re-learn every semester, one class you take may not seem to relate to others you are in, but eventually you find a connection. It’s also about applying those connections in order to utilize them within your profession and enriching yourself along the way.

Schwa Has One Good Life…

18 Jan

Here’s a quick little linguistic joke since the weekend is just about there! Time for some (minor) relaxation! I just love these “Linguist Llama” memes… some are quite funny.:)

On a side note: I’ve finally got some responses back on possible SLP shadow opportunities! Now I just need to get some more responses, as well as some volunteer placements and I’ll be one happy lady this semester!

Speech Therapists Don't Get Apples!

Android Reviews and Microsoft Office Files for SLPs

Dr. Bronwyn Hemsley

Discovery Early Career Researcher and Senior Lecturer Speech Pathology The University of Newcastle NSW Australia

The Scholarly Kitchen

What’s Hot and Cooking In Scholarly Publishing

juliesdisneyadventures

This blog is for documenting my journey through the Disney College Program

Home Sweet Blog

Mommy, Wife, and Student in the Midwest

Thinking of a better blog name

Some thoughts on Speech and Language Therapy/Pathology and PhDs

Speak Easy.

another aspiring speech-language pathologist.

The Speech Clinic

A Private Practice Speech Therapy Clinic

Medical Speech Pathology

Curiosity, Dialogue, and Knowledge

k-bee, SLP (grad student)

"She is clothed in strength & dignity, and laughs without fear of the future." Proverbs 31:25

A Fish Called Ghoti

Musings of a Sometimes Speechie / Full-time PhD student / Eternally Type A Little Miss.

Creating PatientBase

Follow the startup of a health information technology company

Hanna B. SLP

Musings from the world of self-regulation and social communication

Chapel Hill Snippets

A guide on linguistics, language and speech language pathology

38 Things...

A guide on linguistics, language and speech language pathology

The Ultimate Palindrome

Just Another Day in the Life of an Average High Schooler

Anny Reads and Rolls

Despre cărți, oameni și impresii

%d bloggers like this: