Tag Archives: interests

Keeping the “Information Itch” at Bay: Resources for Knowledge

4 Jul
English: Books available for Guantanamo captiv...

English: Books available for Guantanamo captives to read. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Since I have a tendency to have trouble not pondering about academics outside of the school year, I’ve managed to find some ways to stay current and read up on some issues within our field. It’s a good way to stay on top of things, become aware of novel(or recurring) issues within the academic and clinical side of Speech-Language Pathology, as well as soothe the itch of entertaining myself til the school year. Like I said before, I’m a nerd, which is good for this profession, in a sense.

Of course one way I’ve managed to keep the beast at bay is through reading other blogs. It’s interesting to see all the different perspective that professionals and students can have about SLP in general, their specialty, or research. In fact, one blogger, Rachel Wynn, has called her fellow bloggers together to spend some time delving into current research and posing their comments on the article they read [1]. This is quite exciting, as she herself points out that many working SLPs often get caught up in all their work, and don’t have much time to peruse through research, which is why she encourages a post once a month, and then she will collect it all into one post for others to skim through other research for information. It’s quite a great, collaborative idea! Besides this, simply reading other blogs and their take on news, research, techniques, apps or daily happenings in SLP is superb as well. I love seeing all the activities that SLPs come up with. If you want to read some blogs, go to the right side of my page where you’ll see some listed; I actually follow many more that aren’t shown due the amount of blogs and space on this blog design. If you’d like to see more, just e-mail me and I’ll share others! You can also check out the top blogs in any Google search. All of this information will help me in my clinical placements, as well as when I’m a working SLP!

There are also some print materials that aid my SLP-information-itch. If you’re a NSSLHA or ASHA member, you should receive e-mails when a new volume of the latest journal are out, as well as have access to them when they are archived [2]. These include the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology (AJSLP) and the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research (JSLHR). Some members may also have access to the American Journal of Audiology (AJA) or Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools (LSHSS). Students are also subscribed to Contemporary Issues in Communication Science and Disorders (CICSD) Journal, which has more articles/research relevant this population [3]. All of these have fascinating research on a variety of topics and have different frequencies of publication, ranging from biannual to every other month. If you do not have the means to have a membership, I do believe that abstracts are free, and there is a $10/article fee or $25 to access all archived articles for a day. So if you’d rather just skim through the archives to read the abstracts and purchase those that strike your fancy, then that could be an option as well. But having a membership does serve well, especially for those in school, as you have unlimited access to research for classes!

Another benefit of membership is the access to Special Interest Groups (SIGs) [4]. These are groups where professionals collaborate and discuss themes pertinent to their specialty. Of course you can join more than one of the nineteen groups, but it does cost some money. These groups range from “Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation” to “Issues in Higher Education” to “Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders” to “Telepractice”. There are plenty more dealing with audiology and it’s components, fluency, gerontology, multiculturalism and language, among others. I’m personally part of “Language Learning and Education” and ” Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations”. If I had more money, I would’ve joined a few others as well, since many of them sound interesting! The ones I’m currently in are great, provide so much information… anyway, back to the meat of the post. What these groups offer information-wise are online “Perspectives” which are journals specific to that SIG’s theme, as well as access to discussion boards. I actually get the discussion board correspondences sent to my e-mail. These are extremely helpful, as members bring up issues within the field, as well as for assistance with an issue they are having, which can be helpful to you now or in the long run. Just another way to stay up-to-date on happenings that arise in the profession/ your specialty.

Besides research, there are also newsletters that can help you maintain and gain relevant information. They are also great sources for knowledge on other professionals and sometimes tips for a certain event or problem. The ASHA Leader tends to be more for professionals, but, as I keep hinting at, this can help students learn stuff they might not learn in class as well as shed light on the profession itself. For students, there are also a couple of publications:  NSSLHA In The Loop and NSSLHA Now! Newsletter that publish articles geared towards students within the Communication Science and Disorders realm. They even post CFY listings and accept some articles written by students, so if your creative juices are flowing and you are knowledgable about something of student interest, then have a go and see if you get published! (The CICSD also accepts student research and has a mentoring program.) As with the research journals, these are also archived, just follow the link listed below [5].

Lastly, I’ve become aware of two other opportunities for free-time knowledge quests. First, there’s the ASHA Podcast Series which entail interviews with professionals making strides in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology [6]. I have yet to view these, but once I do I’ll tell you what I think! Second, there are other e-newsletters that ASHA provides which cover several different themes that pertain to all professions under ASHA’s scope [7]. I’ll try to read these over and see if any of them will be added to my reading list. Some seem interesting, so we’ll see!

If this post won’t help your ‘information itch’ then I’m not sure what will! Hope you find some that tickle your fancy and enjoy! Also, if anyone has suggestions of other places for interesting/relevant information, please share!

Related Articles/References:

[1] Blogging About Research : from Rachel Wynn at “Talks Just Fine”

[2] ASHA Journal Archives

[3] CICSD Archives

[4] ASHA Special Interest Groups ‘Perspectives’

[5] ASHA Leader ,   NSSLHA Now! Newsletter  and  NSSLHA In The Loop

[6] ASHA Podcast Series

[7] ASHA e-Newsletters

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ASHA Convention Volunteer ?!

22 Jun

Each year the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) has a convention for all professionals whose work related to communication (speech-language pathologists, audiologists, speech and hearing scientists). Along with the professionals, students in the respective fields are invited to attend the event as well. There are a plethora of speakers to listen to, with many slots for attendees to choose from over the 3 day convention (Nov.14-16 in Chicago) . In addition to speakers, there is an exhibition room filled with booths from graduate programs, businesses, etc. Such a superb learning opportunity!

ASHA recognizes that students may not have the funding to attend this event, which is a relief. To aid students who want to attend, they have the opportunity for students to volunteer at the convention. Students can choose which area(s) of the convention they would like to volunteer in and get refunded the cost of the  convention. Not only does this help financially, but it gives students the opportunity to actually see what goes into maintaining and running the convention, as well as networking opportunities! Who could pass that up?

There’s just a small catch– only some students are selected. They also give priority to NSSLHA members. It’s understandable, as I’m sure they receive more than a couple boat-loads of applications! Plus, if you’re aiming on becoming a professional SLP, why wouldn’t you join the student organization? It does cost some money, but it’s a great thing to have on your resume and in general. You have access to Special Interest Groups and articles and much more.

With all this said, I sent in my application to volunteer… so excited! Now it’s just a waiting game until October 2nd. I guess this’ll act as a preview to grad school application season and the waiting!

For those of you who would like to volunteer, here’s a link to the application: http://www.asha.org/Forms/Convention-Student-Volunteer-Application/

Good Luck!

Volunteering Is Almost Okay’ed!

2 Apr

I’m sooo excited. After quite some time passing to get many papers, tests, fingerprinting orders, etc done… I’m 99% the way to volunteering at a school! This is great, as I can get more experience with kids, and some will have disabilities, and some will also meet with SLPs! So now I can get some observation hours in as well (hopefully). I’ve been waiting for this to happen, and now it’s just about here. I love working with kids and seeing them grow, so this will just be all the better. And not only will I get something out of this, the kids will too, as I’ll interact with them and possibly help with projects and such. I’ll keep you guys updated as things get laid out more!

 

I suggest that if you want volunteer hours to look through every facet that you can! I found this by attending a volunteer fair, and a representative from United Way was there and she contacted the director of this program based on my preferences! So you can find these types of things everywhere, and networking helps. There were other great opportunities at the fair too, and just from looking online. So just keep looking, contacting, etc. You should find a good placement within some time! Just remember you’ll probably need to do clearances and possibly some medical tests to work with certain populations. AND always comply with HIPPA!

What’s Up Wednesday: Community Literacy/Action and SLP

27 Mar

Currently, as you may know from a past post, I’m taking a class on literacy, the different aspects of it, and the uses of it. In the class we’ve covered that literacy doesn’t just encompass reading, writing, and direct communication… you can have literacy in all sort of things. There’s: cultural literacy, that with is related to the space around you and your heritage; technological literacy, literacy of machines, computers, etc; spatial literacy, how each area/place/space can have its own literacy to understand… the list goes on.

As part of the course, we are now required to create a project pertaining to community literacy that has some involvement and an end product, whether its a book, gallery, website, video, poster, etc. I wanted to relate mine to Speech-Language Pathology, as it is my future profession, and it does entail some aspects of literacy. This can be as direct as dyslexia, or the deeper connections of tying letters and words to certain structures and meaning. (In our class definition, we also included being able to understand and be understood when communicating, which are the parallels to receptive and expressive communication in SLP.

Now, I’ve been thinking about my project a great deal and still am finding some hurdles… mostly dealing with what I want to accomplish (I have a few different ideas) and getting participants. I have 3 options as of now: 1. create a video with professionals and patients pertaining to life  with the disorder/ working with it and bullying. The community literacy aspect would then be educating others about the disorders through this video. 2. Having some sort of reading or writing workshop with a group of individuals with these disorders to promote literacy and perhaps function as a support group. 3. Have each of them draw/write/speak a short story in relation to a subject, perhaps their vision of a hero, then share them with others to promote knowledge about the vast array that these disorders come in.

Originally, my goal was to have something that I could continue after the semester and into following semesters but that is looking unlikely. What do you guys think? Are one of these options plausible? Or what are other ideas? As you see, community literacy can be advocacy as well.

 

If you want more information about how Literacy is something to be considered for SLPs to be knowledgeable in, feel free to see my blog post “Literacy and Therapy.”

Social Media and SLP

23 Mar

It’s already known that we’re in the age of technology and that it has a great role in our society. Instead of steering clear from it, as future Speech-Language Pathologists, we should embrace it. I’ve already Pintrest before… and you should indeed join that website as well! There are so many SLPs and students studying to be one on that site. They pin great websites, activities, ideas, etc for our profession. To go along with this, I’ve compiled a list (not super exhaustive) of groups on Facebook and trends/ people on twitter to check out. These are just places to start, as there are many others, and they will give you an extra resource and network for your career.

Facebook:

– Future SLPs (Speech – Language Pathologists)

-IMAGAS ( Insight, Mentoring, And Guidance for Aspiring SLPs)

-National Student Speech Language Hearing Association (NSSLHA)

– The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

– the group for your state, like Pennsylvania Speech-Language-Hearing Association

Twitter:

#slpbloggers

#SLPeeps

#slp2b

#preSLP

@ASHAWeb

@NSSLHA

 

Websites:

http://www.reddit.com/r/slp

Research, Research, Research

10 Feb

If you know me, you know I love learning and expanding my knowledge, especially if it’s something I’m interested in. And well, I’m one happy chica right now, as I get to research two separate topics dealing with two different things I love (with some over-lapping!). My first project is a paper on Childhood Apraxia for my Intro to SLP class. I love learning about different diseases, how they relate to speech disorders and development and just anything to do with children or my future profession! (Although, I’m not dead-set on child therapy yet, but considering I’ve had more experience with kids makes it more viable.) It was a hard decision choosing a topic for this because, similar to the child-adult debate, there’s some uncertainty about what I want to specialize in, if I do. There’s just sooo many possibilities that I didn’t know about! Childhood Apraxia of Speech ended up beating out the other contenders, though! It is just captivating, especially since it’s not really acquired, which means that the child was born with it. And it has such a range of severity, with the most severe being almost unable to say any formidable and understandable words. How could that not spark interest?! I’ll be looking into many things, including possible therapies and such, so I’ll be up-to-date on that by the end of this!

 

The second project I am taking part in is actually a group project for my Genes and Diseases class (gahhh, genetics! I love it.) Turns out we are all CSD majors, and our topic was narrowed down to Deafness. For this we’ll have to figure out how it goes from a mutation in the DNA that mis-translates into a bad protein that then causes deafness. Apparently there are many genes related to deafness! We had to pick one that seemed most prevalent so we were certain we’d find enough info.  We also get to actually see where it is located and everything! Which makes me all the more excited since it’ll help me curb my appetite for genetics. I may also be able to use this information in my career as an SLP, especially since I hope to learn ASL. 🙂

 

I’ll be sure to keep you guys updated on anything I find interesting and whatnot! What are some diseases, conditions or anything related to Speech-Language Pathology or genetics that interest you?

Free Funky February SLP Materials!

3 Feb

Hey! Sooo, I’ve had the creative bug hit me lately, and that led me to attempting to make some therapy materials. Although there are two big holidays in February (Groundhogs Day and Valentines Day), I wanted to do a lesser-known and kind of fun holiday! I searched for weird February holidays and….. I found Don’t Cry Over Spilled Milk Day! Sounds like an interesting and fun holiday, right? It’s celebrated on February 11th, so it can be a fun Monday activity. 🙂

 

Now, I’ve never made these before and I’m not sure what program SLPs use to create their materials, but I think these turned out decent. Some parts (aka my drawings) may be juvenile-ish, but it’s hard to draw on Paint! Luckily, they are FREE! Hopefully you guys like them AND iif you have any hints or tips, PLEASE let me know!

 

It’s mostly based off of building expressive  and receptive language with some activities and even a fun game! There’s some some other things tested like fine motor skills, memory and comprehension.

 

PLEASE comment, like, do the poll and/or   reblog/subscribe if you use it so I know people saw this and like it!  Thanks soooooo much!Here’s both materials:

Don’t Cry Over Spilled Milk Materials             Milk and Cookies Gameboard

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