Tag Archives: nsslha

Keeping the “Information Itch” at Bay: Resources for Knowledge

4 Jul
English: Books available for Guantanamo captiv...

English: Books available for Guantanamo captives to read. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Since I have a tendency to have trouble not pondering about academics outside of the school year, I’ve managed to find some ways to stay current and read up on some issues within our field. It’s a good way to stay on top of things, become aware of novel(or recurring) issues within the academic and clinical side of Speech-Language Pathology, as well as soothe the itch of entertaining myself til the school year. Like I said before, I’m a nerd, which is good for this profession, in a sense.

Of course one way I’ve managed to keep the beast at bay is through reading other blogs. It’s interesting to see all the different perspective that professionals and students can have about SLP in general, their specialty, or research. In fact, one blogger, Rachel Wynn, has called her fellow bloggers together to spend some time delving into current research and posing their comments on the article they read [1]. This is quite exciting, as she herself points out that many working SLPs often get caught up in all their work, and don’t have much time to peruse through research, which is why she encourages a post once a month, and then she will collect it all into one post for others to skim through other research for information. It’s quite a great, collaborative idea! Besides this, simply reading other blogs and their take on news, research, techniques, apps or daily happenings in SLP is superb as well. I love seeing all the activities that SLPs come up with. If you want to read some blogs, go to the right side of my page where you’ll see some listed; I actually follow many more that aren’t shown due the amount of blogs and space on this blog design. If you’d like to see more, just e-mail me and I’ll share others! You can also check out the top blogs in any Google search. All of this information will help me in my clinical placements, as well as when I’m a working SLP!

There are also some print materials that aid my SLP-information-itch. If you’re a NSSLHA or ASHA member, you should receive e-mails when a new volume of the latest journal are out, as well as have access to them when they are archived [2]. These include the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology (AJSLP) and the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research (JSLHR). Some members may also have access to the American Journal of Audiology (AJA) or Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools (LSHSS). Students are also subscribed to Contemporary Issues in Communication Science and Disorders (CICSD) Journal, which has more articles/research relevant this population [3]. All of these have fascinating research on a variety of topics and have different frequencies of publication, ranging from biannual to every other month. If you do not have the means to have a membership, I do believe that abstracts are free, and there is a $10/article fee or $25 to access all archived articles for a day. So if you’d rather just skim through the archives to read the abstracts and purchase those that strike your fancy, then that could be an option as well. But having a membership does serve well, especially for those in school, as you have unlimited access to research for classes!

Another benefit of membership is the access to Special Interest Groups (SIGs) [4]. These are groups where professionals collaborate and discuss themes pertinent to their specialty. Of course you can join more than one of the nineteen groups, but it does cost some money. These groups range from “Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation” to “Issues in Higher Education” to “Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders” to “Telepractice”. There are plenty more dealing with audiology and it’s components, fluency, gerontology, multiculturalism and language, among others. I’m personally part of “Language Learning and Education” and ” Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations”. If I had more money, I would’ve joined a few others as well, since many of them sound interesting! The ones I’m currently in are great, provide so much information… anyway, back to the meat of the post. What these groups offer information-wise are online “Perspectives” which are journals specific to that SIG’s theme, as well as access to discussion boards. I actually get the discussion board correspondences sent to my e-mail. These are extremely helpful, as members bring up issues within the field, as well as for assistance with an issue they are having, which can be helpful to you now or in the long run. Just another way to stay up-to-date on happenings that arise in the profession/ your specialty.

Besides research, there are also newsletters that can help you maintain and gain relevant information. They are also great sources for knowledge on other professionals and sometimes tips for a certain event or problem. The ASHA Leader tends to be more for professionals, but, as I keep hinting at, this can help students learn stuff they might not learn in class as well as shed light on the profession itself. For students, there are also a couple of publications:  NSSLHA In The Loop and NSSLHA Now! Newsletter that publish articles geared towards students within the Communication Science and Disorders realm. They even post CFY listings and accept some articles written by students, so if your creative juices are flowing and you are knowledgable about something of student interest, then have a go and see if you get published! (The CICSD also accepts student research and has a mentoring program.) As with the research journals, these are also archived, just follow the link listed below [5].

Lastly, I’ve become aware of two other opportunities for free-time knowledge quests. First, there’s the ASHA Podcast Series which entail interviews with professionals making strides in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology [6]. I have yet to view these, but once I do I’ll tell you what I think! Second, there are other e-newsletters that ASHA provides which cover several different themes that pertain to all professions under ASHA’s scope [7]. I’ll try to read these over and see if any of them will be added to my reading list. Some seem interesting, so we’ll see!

If this post won’t help your ‘information itch’ then I’m not sure what will! Hope you find some that tickle your fancy and enjoy! Also, if anyone has suggestions of other places for interesting/relevant information, please share!

Related Articles/References:

[1] Blogging About Research : from Rachel Wynn at “Talks Just Fine”

[2] ASHA Journal Archives

[3] CICSD Archives

[4] ASHA Special Interest Groups ‘Perspectives’

[5] ASHA Leader ,   NSSLHA Now! Newsletter  and  NSSLHA In The Loop

[6] ASHA Podcast Series

[7] ASHA e-Newsletters

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ASHA Convention Volunteer ?!

22 Jun

Each year the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) has a convention for all professionals whose work related to communication (speech-language pathologists, audiologists, speech and hearing scientists). Along with the professionals, students in the respective fields are invited to attend the event as well. There are a plethora of speakers to listen to, with many slots for attendees to choose from over the 3 day convention (Nov.14-16 in Chicago) . In addition to speakers, there is an exhibition room filled with booths from graduate programs, businesses, etc. Such a superb learning opportunity!

ASHA recognizes that students may not have the funding to attend this event, which is a relief. To aid students who want to attend, they have the opportunity for students to volunteer at the convention. Students can choose which area(s) of the convention they would like to volunteer in and get refunded the cost of the  convention. Not only does this help financially, but it gives students the opportunity to actually see what goes into maintaining and running the convention, as well as networking opportunities! Who could pass that up?

There’s just a small catch– only some students are selected. They also give priority to NSSLHA members. It’s understandable, as I’m sure they receive more than a couple boat-loads of applications! Plus, if you’re aiming on becoming a professional SLP, why wouldn’t you join the student organization? It does cost some money, but it’s a great thing to have on your resume and in general. You have access to Special Interest Groups and articles and much more.

With all this said, I sent in my application to volunteer… so excited! Now it’s just a waiting game until October 2nd. I guess this’ll act as a preview to grad school application season and the waiting!

For those of you who would like to volunteer, here’s a link to the application: http://www.asha.org/Forms/Convention-Student-Volunteer-Application/

Good Luck!

Social Media and SLP

23 Mar

It’s already known that we’re in the age of technology and that it has a great role in our society. Instead of steering clear from it, as future Speech-Language Pathologists, we should embrace it. I’ve already Pintrest before… and you should indeed join that website as well! There are so many SLPs and students studying to be one on that site. They pin great websites, activities, ideas, etc for our profession. To go along with this, I’ve compiled a list (not super exhaustive) of groups on Facebook and trends/ people on twitter to check out. These are just places to start, as there are many others, and they will give you an extra resource and network for your career.

Facebook:

– Future SLPs (Speech – Language Pathologists)

-IMAGAS ( Insight, Mentoring, And Guidance for Aspiring SLPs)

-National Student Speech Language Hearing Association (NSSLHA)

– The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

– the group for your state, like Pennsylvania Speech-Language-Hearing Association

Twitter:

#slpbloggers

#SLPeeps

#slp2b

#preSLP

@ASHAWeb

@NSSLHA

 

Websites:

http://www.reddit.com/r/slp

Philanthropies/Organizations to be involved with

1 Feb

As  student and eventually professional, you’ll want to be associated with some organizations or charities. These will most likely have some relation to your field; such as, if you’re a doctor you might join Doctors Without Borders, or if you’re studying Political Science you are probably involved with Student Government. There’s many possibilities for you to get involved with, whether you want to volunteer some of your time or simply become more educated about your field/community. Here’s  a list of possible ones you might want to be involved with as a future/ current SLP. 🙂  I’ve listed them under “Semi-Mandatory” for ones you will need to join, or most likely should join, and then “Optional” for those you don’t need but can do based on your interests and intentions.

SEMI-MANDATORY:

-ASHA ( American Speech-Language-Hearing Assoc.) – for SLPs, Audiologists and Speech/Hearing Scientists

-NSSLHA (National Student Speech-Language and Hearing Assoc.)- for undergrad/grad students studying CSD/SLP.

** there is a national chapter, and probably a local one at your school

OPTIONAL:

-Linguistics, Psychology or language club. These are all related to SLP

-Volunteer Clubs (ie. Project Sunshine, Circle K, etc)

-Special Olympics

-Tutoring/mentoring program, like AmericaReads or JumpStart

-Non-profits for Apraxia, Autism, Cerebral Palsy, Veteran Services, Operation Smile other diseases related to SLP

-Participate in walks for Apraxia, Autism…

-Multicultural club/organization

-state NSSLHA/ ASHA

-charities for speech, behavioral, mental disorders

This isn’t an extensive list, just some ideas that came to mind… if you can think of any more, let me know! 🙂 I’ll certainly add them and give credit!

Supplements (aka Gaining Experience… aka Getting Those 25 Hours)

18 Jan

As per the CSD program at my school, we are required to have 25 hours of observation of SLPs/Audiologists in order to graduate with a BS in CSD. Now, I don’t know much about other university’s programs, but I think all future SLPs and Audiologists in training need these as well. Luckily most students around here can achieve this goal in a class that my university provides. BUT… who wants to be average? Most graduate programs want people that have a list of observation/volunteer/shadowing hours that they can boast about. Of course, for those, like me, who haven’t  been volunteering at a summer camp for 5 years may be a bit perplexed as to where to find these elusive opportunities to become competitive and be able to hold those Graduate Admissions people’s gaze for longer than a second with a piece of paper. After all, it’s kinda scary knowing that you have to layout all of your hard work and extra experiences on a paper only in hopes that it’ll supplement the stellar statement of intent and amazing letters of recommendation you’ll provide. To help,I’ve compiled a list of possible places you can find these seemingly hard-to-find resume boosters.

 

*Note: I say resume builders, but you should in no way simply do these to help your chances. You should want to help people and gain experience in your field anyway! The main, and primary, reason I am doing these is because I truly like helping others and I want to get involved in my community and learn about my field. After all, if the admissions committee asks why you took part in X with Y population, you’ll be stuck if you just want to say it was for your resume. You want to have an attachment to what you do so you can elaborate on why you chose that place and how it pertains to you as a person and what you want to do in life. (The good thing about this field is that there is a vast array of places you can volunteer to suit you.)

 

Observations:

SLP/AUD offices    –    Hospitals (Childrens, Medical)   –    Specialty Places (Ear& Eye Clinics, Voice Centers, Accent Reduction Areas, Swallowing… most hospitals have these within their practices too!)   –   Daycare (Adult, Children, Handicapped/Disabled)    –    Schools (Regular, Special Ed, Deaf/Blind)   –   After School Programs  –   War Vet Places

 

Volunteering:

Library(reading to kids, tutor)  –   Education (tutor/mentor, after school, urban literacy programs)   –   SLP/AUD offices   –   Hospitals    –   Elderly home   –   Daycare (regular, special needs)    –  Youth Mentoring Programs (Big Brother/Sister, YMCA, JumpStart   –    ESL student conversation partner   –   Tutor (children, adult literacy learners, Refugees, ESL, or at your university)    –   Summer Camps for Special Needs   – ASHA convention

 

Clubs:

NSSLHA ** (local chapter, national chapter)   –   Linguistics Club   –   YMCA   –   Any about literacy, tutoring  –   volunteer clubs

 

Research:

Language and Psychology/Brain   –   Speech   –   Aural   –   Child Language Acquisition   –  Speech Disorders   *look up professors interests and e-mail ones you might like working with

 

 

Hope these ideas help! I’d say aim for 45-50 volunteer/observation hours to be competitive!

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