Tag Archives: SLP materials

Keeping the “Information Itch” at Bay: Resources for Knowledge

4 Jul
English: Books available for Guantanamo captiv...

English: Books available for Guantanamo captives to read. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Since I have a tendency to have trouble not pondering about academics outside of the school year, I’ve managed to find some ways to stay current and read up on some issues within our field. It’s a good way to stay on top of things, become aware of novel(or recurring) issues within the academic and clinical side of Speech-Language Pathology, as well as soothe the itch of entertaining myself til the school year. Like I said before, I’m a nerd, which is good for this profession, in a sense.

Of course one way I’ve managed to keep the beast at bay is through reading other blogs. It’s interesting to see all the different perspective that professionals and students can have about SLP in general, their specialty, or research. In fact, one blogger, Rachel Wynn, has called her fellow bloggers together to spend some time delving into current research and posing their comments on the article they read [1]. This is quite exciting, as she herself points out that many working SLPs often get caught up in all their work, and don’t have much time to peruse through research, which is why she encourages a post once a month, and then she will collect it all into one post for others to skim through other research for information. It’s quite a great, collaborative idea! Besides this, simply reading other blogs and their take on news, research, techniques, apps or daily happenings in SLP is superb as well. I love seeing all the activities that SLPs come up with. If you want to read some blogs, go to the right side of my page where you’ll see some listed; I actually follow many more that aren’t shown due the amount of blogs and space on this blog design. If you’d like to see more, just e-mail me and I’ll share others! You can also check out the top blogs in any Google search. All of this information will help me in my clinical placements, as well as when I’m a working SLP!

There are also some print materials that aid my SLP-information-itch. If you’re a NSSLHA or ASHA member, you should receive e-mails when a new volume of the latest journal are out, as well as have access to them when they are archived [2]. These include the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology (AJSLP) and the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research (JSLHR). Some members may also have access to the American Journal of Audiology (AJA) or Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools (LSHSS). Students are also subscribed to Contemporary Issues in Communication Science and Disorders (CICSD) Journal, which has more articles/research relevant this population [3]. All of these have fascinating research on a variety of topics and have different frequencies of publication, ranging from biannual to every other month. If you do not have the means to have a membership, I do believe that abstracts are free, and there is a $10/article fee or $25 to access all archived articles for a day. So if you’d rather just skim through the archives to read the abstracts and purchase those that strike your fancy, then that could be an option as well. But having a membership does serve well, especially for those in school, as you have unlimited access to research for classes!

Another benefit of membership is the access to Special Interest Groups (SIGs) [4]. These are groups where professionals collaborate and discuss themes pertinent to their specialty. Of course you can join more than one of the nineteen groups, but it does cost some money. These groups range from “Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation” to “Issues in Higher Education” to “Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders” to “Telepractice”. There are plenty more dealing with audiology and it’s components, fluency, gerontology, multiculturalism and language, among others. I’m personally part of “Language Learning and Education” and ” Communication Disorders and Sciences in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) Populations”. If I had more money, I would’ve joined a few others as well, since many of them sound interesting! The ones I’m currently in are great, provide so much information… anyway, back to the meat of the post. What these groups offer information-wise are online “Perspectives” which are journals specific to that SIG’s theme, as well as access to discussion boards. I actually get the discussion board correspondences sent to my e-mail. These are extremely helpful, as members bring up issues within the field, as well as for assistance with an issue they are having, which can be helpful to you now or in the long run. Just another way to stay up-to-date on happenings that arise in the profession/ your specialty.

Besides research, there are also newsletters that can help you maintain and gain relevant information. They are also great sources for knowledge on other professionals and sometimes tips for a certain event or problem. The ASHA Leader tends to be more for professionals, but, as I keep hinting at, this can help students learn stuff they might not learn in class as well as shed light on the profession itself. For students, there are also a couple of publications:  NSSLHA In The Loop and NSSLHA Now! Newsletter that publish articles geared towards students within the Communication Science and Disorders realm. They even post CFY listings and accept some articles written by students, so if your creative juices are flowing and you are knowledgable about something of student interest, then have a go and see if you get published! (The CICSD also accepts student research and has a mentoring program.) As with the research journals, these are also archived, just follow the link listed below [5].

Lastly, I’ve become aware of two other opportunities for free-time knowledge quests. First, there’s the ASHA Podcast Series which entail interviews with professionals making strides in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology [6]. I have yet to view these, but once I do I’ll tell you what I think! Second, there are other e-newsletters that ASHA provides which cover several different themes that pertain to all professions under ASHA’s scope [7]. I’ll try to read these over and see if any of them will be added to my reading list. Some seem interesting, so we’ll see!

If this post won’t help your ‘information itch’ then I’m not sure what will! Hope you find some that tickle your fancy and enjoy! Also, if anyone has suggestions of other places for interesting/relevant information, please share!

Related Articles/References:

[1] Blogging About Research : from Rachel Wynn at “Talks Just Fine”

[2] ASHA Journal Archives

[3] CICSD Archives

[4] ASHA Special Interest Groups ‘Perspectives’

[5] ASHA Leader ,   NSSLHA Now! Newsletter  and  NSSLHA In The Loop

[6] ASHA Podcast Series

[7] ASHA e-Newsletters

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What’s Up Wednesday: Organization/Study Methods

3 Apr

As any aspiring professional, or at least I hope, I’m on a mission to gain as much knowledge as I can about my future profession. I want to learn it and retain it, every little bit. I just have some slight issues: note organization and retaining the mass of information. I’m able to remember the gist of things, and most details, but I want to remember it all so I have a great repertoire to draw from. As for organization, my notes from past and current classes are slightly organized in a few folders, but I’d like to have them better filed for reference. So how do I plan about doing these tasks? Here’s what I’ve come up with:

I know I tend to learn by writing, so this may seem tedious for some. But for me, this should lead to positive results:

-Take notes in class and from readings, either in a 5 subject notebook or one notebook for all classes (you’ll see why this doesn’t matter as much later). Star/Highlight anything said multiple times or pointed out by teacher.

-Re-write these notes more neatly, and more organized, in the designated single subject notebook for each class/topic.

  • color code all things that were starred/highlighted from notes: blue for terms/definitions; green for concepts; red for extra information pointed out or that seems important; yellow for assessment/treatment tests and techniques

– When it’s near test time, re-write the notes in a summarized form, with the most important information. This will be used to study for tests (and re-read the full notes a few times as well).

-Make note cards to use for random practice throughout year to stay up-to-date on information.

-Place the single-subject notebooks and any handouts in an accordion folder/ small box for safe keeping and future reference. If there is extra room in single-subject notebook, then rip out pages and place them in a folder with handouts to put in accordion folder. The extra pages can then be used for another subject, and the folder will save space in the accordion folder/box. Be a tree hugger!

I’m hoping that by using this system I can be more well organized and create a way to store/ review information when needed in the future. Hopefully you find this, or an adapted version, helpful for your studies!

Social Media and SLP

23 Mar

It’s already known that we’re in the age of technology and that it has a great role in our society. Instead of steering clear from it, as future Speech-Language Pathologists, we should embrace it. I’ve already Pintrest before… and you should indeed join that website as well! There are so many SLPs and students studying to be one on that site. They pin great websites, activities, ideas, etc for our profession. To go along with this, I’ve compiled a list (not super exhaustive) of groups on Facebook and trends/ people on twitter to check out. These are just places to start, as there are many others, and they will give you an extra resource and network for your career.

Facebook:

– Future SLPs (Speech – Language Pathologists)

-IMAGAS ( Insight, Mentoring, And Guidance for Aspiring SLPs)

-National Student Speech Language Hearing Association (NSSLHA)

– The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

– the group for your state, like Pennsylvania Speech-Language-Hearing Association

Twitter:

#slpbloggers

#SLPeeps

#slp2b

#preSLP

@ASHAWeb

@NSSLHA

 

Websites:

http://www.reddit.com/r/slp

What’s Up Wednesday: App Review- “4 Pics 1 Word”

6 Feb

Screen Shot of App

Lately I’ve been trying out random apps on my phone and tablet to find some ways to entertain myself. Most of them end up getting scrapped, but my latest find seems to be sticking around! It’s called “4 Pics 1 Word.” As you may guess, the task is to look at 4 pictures and infer a word that they all have in common. There are some letters given, and boxes with the amount of spaces for letters in the word.

Now, how can this help clients, children or adults, with speech disorders? I think it’s very beneficial for receptive language, as you must take in the given visual images and conclude what they all have in common . This also helps enforce that some words/morphemes have multiple semantic varieties. One example is given with the pictures: present with a bow, a person leaning forward, a bow and arrow, and a ship. All four of these illustrate four different meanings that the word “bow”, as in: (1)the bow on a gift, (2) the verb “to bow”, (3) bow (and arrow) and (4) the bow of a ship. These also can be used for teaching morphophonological variation, phonemes and help with phonological disorders since there are two separate ways to say the word “bow” in the above examples. You could ask the client if any of them are said differently and, if so, how to say all the different possibilities. (Along with asking how each one is different, despite having the same word). In this example the possibilities would be [bau]  (2&4),  and [bou] (1&3).  As a side note, not all of these are concrete definitive words, instead some are concepts like “heavy” and “new.”

Best of all, it’s free! I’m sure there’s plenty of other apps that can help with these, but I thought I’d share this random find of mine. Please feel free to suggest anything you have found as well. I’d love to hear them!

*pic found at this link.

Free Funky February SLP Materials!

3 Feb

Hey! Sooo, I’ve had the creative bug hit me lately, and that led me to attempting to make some therapy materials. Although there are two big holidays in February (Groundhogs Day and Valentines Day), I wanted to do a lesser-known and kind of fun holiday! I searched for weird February holidays and….. I found Don’t Cry Over Spilled Milk Day! Sounds like an interesting and fun holiday, right? It’s celebrated on February 11th, so it can be a fun Monday activity. 🙂

 

Now, I’ve never made these before and I’m not sure what program SLPs use to create their materials, but I think these turned out decent. Some parts (aka my drawings) may be juvenile-ish, but it’s hard to draw on Paint! Luckily, they are FREE! Hopefully you guys like them AND iif you have any hints or tips, PLEASE let me know!

 

It’s mostly based off of building expressive  and receptive language with some activities and even a fun game! There’s some some other things tested like fine motor skills, memory and comprehension.

 

PLEASE comment, like, do the poll and/or   reblog/subscribe if you use it so I know people saw this and like it!  Thanks soooooo much!Here’s both materials:

Don’t Cry Over Spilled Milk Materials             Milk and Cookies Gameboard

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